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Building the Future

LAYING THE FOUNDATIONS FOR AN EV FUTURE IN AUSTRALIA

OUR GOALS

Our aim is to speed the transition of electric vehicles to RHD markets and increase customer access to every step in the EV supply chain. We want to build the future of the market before it is too late, and keep manufacturing in Australia.

Key Insights

AUSEV are confident that electric vehicles will be the way of the future and the transition is happening at a much quicker pace than anticipated. We have conducted extensive market research across all aspects of the EV industry and have provided some key insights which act as a constant driver for AUSEV to keep pushing forward.

Economic Opportunity

By investing across the entire EV supply chain and attracting international OEMs, Australia has the resources to become a critical minerals superpower and a major player in the global battery and EV manufacture markets.

INCREASED SAVINGS ACROSS MULTIPLE INDUSTRIES
UP TO 67% LOWER LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS
REDUCED NOISE AND AIR POLLUTION

ENVIRONMENT

Electric vehicles have lower lifecycle emissions compared to petrol and diesel vehicles. Given most vehicles last 15-20 years, Australia only has until around 2035 to sell the last, new petrol and diesel vehicles.

FUEL SAVINGS

Australia’s heavy reliance on imported, foreign fuel leads to high costs for customers and businesses. Replacing liquid fuel with electricity will save electric vehicle owners up to $1,500 per year.

UP TO $1,500 PER YEAR IN FUEL SAVINGS

REDUCE DEPENDENCE ON IMPORTS
CREATE AUSTRALIAN JOBS

FUEL SECURITY

Electric vehicles powered by Australian Owned and Made renewable energy will stabilise our fuel supply and prices while creating jobs and securing future energy supply.

Comparisons

It’s important to consider all the facts when purchasing a new EV – please see the below fact sheet to aid in the cost of ownership comparison.

FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Electric vehicles (EVs) are vehicles powered at least partly by electricity. This includes battery electric vehicles (BEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs). The EVC does not include non-plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) under the term ‘EV’ and groups them with other internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs).

EVs already have a comparable total cost of ownership to ICEVs and will be cheaper up-front in some markets by 2025. A lack of government support has generally meant Australia misses out on the cheapest EVs available in other right-hand markets like the UK. That is why there are only 3 BEVs and 3 PHEVs available here under $50,000. However, many more are expected by the end of 2022. Increasing numbers of EVs in corporate and government fleets will boost the second-hand market, making EVs even more affordable.

EVs are good value when you include maintenance and fuel costs. This is because EVs are 70% cheaper to refuel (saving the average driver $1,600 per year) and have fewer moving parts (saving drivers around $400 per year on maintenance).

Today’s EV batteries are expected to last as long as – if not longer than – the average car does, that is, around 15 years.

After their life in an EV, batteries can be recycled and repurposed. Such recycling will also significantly reduce the amount of mining required for EV components.

Cheaper EVs can travel around 300km on one charge while more expensive EVs can travel over 600km. As battery technology improves, range will continue to increase. Australians drive an average of 36km per day so EVs are already suitable for most journeys.

Most EV drivers charge their car overnight at home just like a phone, but public infrastructure remains important, especially for people living in apartments and renters. Back in 2018, Sylvia Wilson was able to drive 20,000km around Australia’s entire perimeter in an EV. Since then, governments and private companies have provided significant investment to dramatically increase charger accessibility.

Today there are over 200 fast and ultrafast DC charging locations across Australia and many more public AC chargers. Coverage is only going to get better as uptake increases.